Bob Sigler, Chairperson and CEO

Dr. Robert T. Sigler was a professor at the University of Alabama, Department of Criminal Justice.

Bob Sigler has been actively involved in fundraising for scholastic and sabbatical causes for many years.

Bob Sigler received his doctorate in Sociology-Social Psychology at the University of Missouri-Columbia. He has experience in both juvenile and adult corrections. He has interests in community corrections, juvenile justice, and community relations. His most recent research interests have focused on domestic and courtship violence, stress, and community policing, public perceptions of violence.

Robert Sigler

Mr. Sigler, the founder and CEO of the Global Trust Group (GTG) holding company including Global Key Advisors (Registered Investment Avisor), Global Trust Ventures and the Global Trust Group Alternative Investment Board, has over 25 years of experience in accounting, finance, investment banking, mergers, acquisitions, capital markets, private equity, entrepreneurship, and venture strategy and management.  He owns and has co-founded numerous businesses in regulated and diverse industries and held a variety of domestic and international privileged licenses in gaming, government security and financial securities. Robert is co-owner and President of Partell Specialty Pharmacy; founder of RS Development which successfully developed and branded the “Manhattanization” of Las Vegas condominium properties on Las Vegas Blvd; a seed investor and advisor to numerous successful companies including government security provider SureID, Nautical Control Solutions, Nanofiltration Technologies, Fragmob, Riveting Entertainment, DayDials, ToughPrints, Trendy Butler, Surkus, Tesloop, Aquadesign Innovations, Neuroptics and other companies.  He is a graduate from the Harvard School of business with collateral studies at the Kennedy School of Government and Massachusetts Institute of Technology and was a 4.0 Phi Beta Kappa and Beta Gamma Sigma scholar at the University of Alabama’s Manderson school of Business and Culverhouse School of Accountancy.  Robert was appointed as a Lieutenant Colonel in the Alabama State Militia by Governor Wallace and a U.S. Senate Scholar by Senior Senate Majority Leader Heflin.

Prior to the development of his GTG portfolio of private companies, Robert served as a senior international equities analyst at S.C. Bernstein ($70BN) in New York City where he built an equity research platform for the global automotive industry and served as the lead international automotive equity research analyst covering Europe, Asia, and South America.  His work included extensive research, analysis, and published reporting on the global markets, including determinants of market share, economic trends affecting supply and demand, serially correlative variables in earnings revisions, and strategic drivers and trends in mergers and acquisitions. Robert developed the first comprehensive “Zero Sum” global supply and demand model for the industry, which served as the basis for his ground-up multivariate earnings models. Robert successfully predicted and reported on trends in the global automotive sector, including preparing earnings estimates and investment recommendations for Renault, Peugeot, Volkswagen, Fiat, Toyota, Nissan, Honda, and other global companies. He also served as an investment-banking analyst for Credit Suisse First Boston where he focused on a wide range of domestic and international transactions as a member of the New York office M&A Generalist Group.  His work included mergers, acquisitions, divestitures, and strategic proposals in health care, pharmaceuticals, technology, oil and gas, waste management, technology, and construction with assignments in Asia, South America, and Europe.  Robert served as a member of the international tax group of Price Waterhouse and was selected nationally to serve as a post-graduate research fellow of the Financial and Governmental Accounting Standards Board in Connecticut. He has co-published in the area of corporate governance with industry expert Robert Stobaugh, faculty member of the Harvard Graduate School of Business.

Robert loves working with children and coaching youth sports, and enjoys rock climbing, adventure travel and photography. He is a kenpo karate (Parker-Speakman) Black Belt and 5.0 Fighter world cup MMA champion, member of the Drysdale-Zenith jiu jitsu team, and PADI certified Master & Rescue Diver.

Scholarships

Relatively few resources are available to support students who intend to pursue a career in private non-profit or public service organizations. The Sigler Foundation will provide funds in the form of grants/loans for students who choose to prepare themselves for careers in these areas. Funds may be allocated to cover up to 100% of the direct costs of the applicant’s education for up to four years for an undergraduate degree and up to three years for a graduate degree. The loans will be forgiven for service in public or non-profit organizations at the rate of one year of financial support forgiven for each year of service. Years of debt will be discharged in the order in which they were awarded. Terms for the repayment of grants that are not satisfied by service will be similar to the terms in use for the repayment of federally insured student loans in use at the time the grant is made. Funds will be awarded based on the anticipated value of the graduate’s service in his or her chosen career. Determination of value is a subjective process. Decisions as to the potential value of the contributions of an applicant and the level of funding to be allocated to successful applicants will be made by Foundation staff. Funds will be awarded at the discretion of the Foundation.

Application Process

Student grants will not be awarded on a regular basis. Grants will only be awarded in those years in which a truly exceptional application is received. The exceptional applicant will have an impressive academic record, a record of service to his or her community, demonstrated leadership, and a commitment to a career in community service. International students who choose to study in the United States are welcome to apply. Initial grants will be for one year with funding for successive years dependent on successful progress toward degree completion. Sigler Foundation Scholars will be expected to maintain academic excellence. Applicants for support will prepare a proposal including:

  1. An academic transcript
  2. A resume
  3. A description of the career that the applicant plans to pursue.
  4. An explanation of the reasons why the applicant is the type of person the Sigler Foundation seeks to support.
  5. A description of the academic program that the student intends to pursue
  6. An explanation of the manner in which the academic program selected will prepare the applicant for his or her career.
  7. Three supporting letters form teachers addressing the applicant’s academic potential
  8. Three supporting letters from community representatives addressing the applicant’s commitment to community service.
  9. A budget.

While it is anticipated that support will continue as the student pursues his or her academic career, applications for continuing support will be required each year and will include:

  • A current academic transcript
  • An explanation of any changes in the applicant’s academic plan
  • An explanation of any changes in the applicant’s career plan
  • A budget.

A denial of continuing funding is a serious matter. Such a decision will only be made after discussion of issues with the student and spokespersons whom the student may present to Foundation staff.

Successful applicants who seek to discharge their debt though years of service will submit a proposal describing their proposed activities. Once approved, the applicant will file an annual report documenting continuing qualified employment.

Interns

Student internships are both a valuable learning tool and a source of resources to the agencies that sponsor the internships. In most cases, non-profit and public organizations lack the resources to support an intern. The Sigler Foundation will provide funds to support basic living expenses for internships in which the student provides services to a non-profit or public organization that lacks resources for internship support. The size of the award will be determined by the cost of living in the area in which the services will be provided. In some cases, funds will be made available to support the internship activities. Funds will be awarded based on the value of the services to the organization and on the value of the learning experience for the student. Determination of value is a subjective process. Decisions as to the value of a project and the level of funding to be allocated to successful applicants will be made by Foundation staff. Funds will be awarded at the discretion of the Foundation.

Application Process

Student applicants for support for an internship designed to provide services to a non-profit or public agency will prepare a proposal that will include:

  1. A brief description of the goals of the internship;
  2. the activities that will be undertaken to achieve those goals; and,
  3. he anticipated benefits to both the organization that will receive the service and to the student.
  4. A letter of support from the organization that will receive the services.
  5. A letter of support from the sponsoring academic department.
  6. A proposed budget.

Successful applicants will be required to submit a report of their activities at the conclusion of the internship.

Sabbaticals

Most universities provide regular sabbaticals for faculty. In most cases, the faculty member receives 100% of his or her salary for one semester or 50% of his or her salary for two semesters. The Sigler Foundation will provide funds to match up to 50% of the faculty member’s salary for a two semester project designed to provide services to a non-profit or public organization. In some cases, funds will be made available to support sabbatical activities. Funds will be awarded based on the value of the services to the organization. Determination of value is a subjective process. Decisions as to the value of a project and the level of funding to be allocated to successful applicants will be made by Foundation staff. Funds will be awarded at the discretion of the Foundation.

Application Process

Applicants for support for a sabbatical designed to provide services to a non-profit or public agency will prepare a proposal that will include:

  1. A detailed description of the goals of the sabbatical.
  2. The activities, methods, and procedures that will be undertaken/utilized to achieve those goals; and,
  3. The anticipated benefits to both the organization that will receive the service and to the faculty member.
  4. A letter of support from the organization that will receive the services.
  5. A letter of support from the applicant’s university.
  6. A proposed budget.

Successful applicants will be required to submit a report of their activities at the conclusion of the sabbatical.